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Read Your Bible In A Year – Recommendations from Our Readers

We recently asked our list, “What app/Bible/website would you recommend to a person new to Bible reading who wants to read it in a year?”

Here is the list in the order we received them – if more than one person mentioned it we moved it to the top and italicized the most mentioned.  Our readers/list followers are all denominations united in one common belief Christ as our Savior and the Bible as God’s word.  So here’s the list. It’s quite a mix! You should be able to find one that works for you.

If you know of more, please add them in a comment below!

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Websites:

Apps

  • YouVersion
  • Quick Bible
  • Olive tree app chronological bible reading plan
  • Bible.com apps
  • Logos
  • Touch Bible (can see Hebrew and Greek words with just a touch)
  • My Sword
  • Daily Bread
  • Christian Fellowship Church http://www.cfcindia.com/apps

Bibles

  • NIV Chronological
  • Thomas Nelson’s The NKJV Daily Bible: Read the Entire Bible in One Year
  • Blue Letter Bible
  • 90 Day Bible
  • 365 Day Bible
  • One Year Bible by Charles Stanley
  • The Holy Bible Prophecy Study Edition NKJV
  • Chronological Life Study Bible (Tyndale House Publishers)
  • The Catholic One Year Bible
  • Catholic New American version Study Bible

And here are words of wisdom for those new to Bible study from those same generous souls

Bible_in_a_yearI carry an iPad with me everywhere so I can read my bible whenever I want or when I need to look something up.  Robert

The very best tool for reading the bible in one year is the bible itself and a whole lot of self-discipline! Willie

I don’t recommend reading the bible like that. We are told to savor the scriptures. I simply didn’t get anything out of reading the bible in 365 days.  Harry

Only the Holy Spirit would be capable of compelling an individual to read His Word. #2 in my opinion would be partner accountability and small bible study groups. Jesse

I don’t think of it as “the whole Bible in one year”; rather, I think of it as “my daily Bible reading” — my God-provided “manna” for the day. Fred

Reading the Bible in one year places a limit on what God wants to say.  May He always guide you.  Ray

Read the bible like a book in as short a time span as possible (a few weeks to a month) and the difference it makes is significant.  Lisa

Read the one year Chronological Bible. You read the events in the order that they occurred. It makes more sense that way. Jim

What I will be doing is reading the bible using a DVD. The bible is read to me and I can follow along by watching on the TV with a bible in front of me. I can always have my bible and a note pad and when needed, stop the readings with the pause button, when I get a inspiration or revelation of something, to reference another passage manually. Steve

My recommendation:  Make reading the Bible as important as eating each day and begin it with a prayer asking God to help you understand, retain and apply it as He wills.  Don’t gorge yourself and don’t starve yourself.  Soon, you will find that you desire to know it as much as you desire food.  Jeff

That’s the way I prefer – Just go straight through – Not bouncing back and forth from Old testament to New Testament to Psalms – etc…

I have the Bible in audio format. This encourages me to listen and contemplate each night at bedtime and throughout my workday. I get through the Bible several time per year in this manner. Clarence

The chronological format made it very interesting to follow the flow of the story!

Reading the Bible and understanding what is written – big difference Linda

Reading the Bible through from Genesis to Revelation is in my opinion a great way to do a reading plan because one gets the overall history of the Bible which is very important for understanding the overall theme. It has helped me immensely in my personal life as well as in my preaching ministry. Will

My best tip is to read your Bible first thing in the morning, preferably before breakfast, or you will get too busy during the day or too tired at the end of the day.  I know that personally I will grow cold or cool toward the Lord when I don’t get in His word daily.   Bible reading sets everything right, even though things may go wrong during the day.  I know my Lord is with me.  Ina

I would say start with New Testament first. This would help getting used to language. Then go to Old Testament. Linda

Highlight as you go what speaks to you. This will make it easier to find it again. I highlight a different color each time I read my bible. I find it amazing how some parts have changed to me over the years. The important thing is not getting through the bible in 1 year, the important thing is to learn and remember what you read. Take time to look things up to understand what you read. Pray before you read each day for God to give you understand help you to remember.  This is time spent with God sharing with him his word.

I decided to make an appointment to read the bible and spend time with God.  If I could go to the doctor, see a movie, go to work and to bed on time then I could keep the most important appointment – spending time with God daily.

I set my time for 6:30 when dinner was over, kitchen cleaned and I could focus on His word.  There were no other distractions. That decision set the habit for me. Colleen

I have found just reading the Bible is a waste of time, except for Revelation that promises a blessing to those who read it aloud. You have to study the Bible, dig in, to get something out of it.  At least it is that way for me. Jane

The best way for me is to read it is either in a chronological Bible or with a chronological reading plan.  Reading the Bible in chronological order adds depth, perception and context that you don’t get from reading it in book order or in other disjointed reading plans. David

I don’t worry about my reading volume or ‘coverage‘. I used to feel so guilty once I ‘fell behind’ my schedule. Gary

I always have my Bible on the kitchen table to remind me to read it every day as I prep and eat breakfast. Linda

As a minister and college instructor (bible) I do not often recommend reading through the bible in one year. The reason? The goal becomes reading through the bible instead of studying the bible, its connections with history, events on the news, and using our Holy Spirit given gift with a local body.

I also fear a person’s choice of translations. The easier to read ones often leave something to be desired per inclusiveness. The CEV is one of the easiest to read but it is very loose in its’ verbiage. The YLT is very literal but difficult to read as it translates verbatim without regard to how we speak or read.

I suggest if one plans to complete his or her goal of reading the bible, it will take a discipline more serious than New Year vows or resolutions. Since half our population is visual learners, I recommend one use the visuals and timelines you provide, then then dig into the applicable scripture. Take a book or character, study it, insert it into one of your timelines so the same person can recall by association; i.e. Dale Carnegie. James

While looking for a fresh approach to reading through the Bible each year, I decided to try the “One Year Chronological Bible” NIV. I then bought a book with biblical maps and charts which helped me define, in my own mind, who these people were.  The names of peoples and the names of places they lived have changed down through the ages. I would keep going over to the computer to investigate to try and figure things out.

Then came the Bible time line! The timeline seems to me to tie all of these loose ends together. One can follow the timeline of not only the important places and people of the Bible but one can place them in historical context.  One can see the migration of nations from earliest time to the present day. One can see who were the contemporaries of Bible peoples throughout the world. This has made Bible reading come alive for me. Carol

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What are the names of the 12 apostles?

The original 12 apostles are listed in Matthew 10:2-4, “These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon (who is called Peter) and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus; Simon the Zealot and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Him.”

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The Bible also lists the 12 apostles in Mark 3:16-19 and Luke 6:13-16 with slight differences in the names. Most Bible scholars agree that Thaddaeus was also known as “Judas, son of James” (Luke 6:16) and Lebbaeus (Matthew 10:3). Simon the Zealot was also known as Simon the Canaanite (Mark 3:18).

Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus, was replaced in the twelve apostles by Matthias (see Acts 1:20-26)

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Passover |Old Testament Timeline

The Passover Feast, or Pesach, celebrates the deliverance of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, as recorded in the Book of Exodus. During Passover, Jews also commemorate the birth of the Jewish nation after being freed by God from captivity. Today, the Jewish people not only remember a historical event on the first Passover but also celebrate in a larger sense, their freedom as Jews. The first Passover, according to the Biblical Timeline, occurred on May 4, 1451 B.C.

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The Hebrew word Pesach means, “to pass over.” During the Passover celebration each year, Jews take part in a meal known as the Seder, which features the retelling of the story of Exodus and God’s liberation from their slavery in Egypt. Each partaker of the Passover Seder experiences in an individual way, a national celebration of freedom through God’s divine intervention and deliverance. Hag HaMatzah or the Feast of Unleavened Bread and Yom HaBikkurim or Firstfruits are both mentioned in Leviticus 23 as separate feasts. However, today Jews observe all three feasts as part of the eight-day Passover celebration.

Today, Passover begins on day 15 of the Hebrew month of Nissan, which falls in March or April and continues for 8 days. In Biblical times, Passover began at twilight on the fourteenth day of Nissan, and then the next day, day 15, the Feast of Unleavened Bread would begin and continue for seven days.

The Passover Story

Passover
“With the final plague, God promised to strike dead every first-born son in Egypt”

Joseph, the favored son of Jacob, after being sold into slavery in Egypt, was protected by God and greatly blessed. Ultimately he was put into a high position—second-in-command to Pharaoh. In time, Joseph moved his entire family to Egypt to be near him and help them. This happened in 1706 B.C. By the time of the Exodus, 215 years later, the Israelites had grown into a people numbering over 2 million. In fact, there were so many Jews in Egypt that the new Pharaoh, who had no memory of what the good Joseph had done for his land, was afraid of their power. To retain a feeling of control, he forced the Israelites into slavery, oppressing them with harsh labor and brutal treatment.

However, God had a plan to rescue his people, through a man named Moses. At the time Moses was born, Pharaoh had ordered the death of all Hebrew males, but God spared Moses when his mother hid him in a basket along the banks of the Nile River. Pharaoh’s daughter found the baby and decided to adopt him. Later Moses fled to Midian after killing an Egyptian he had witnessed brutally beating a Hebrew slave.

There God appeared to Moses from within the flames of a burning bush and said:

“And the LORD said, I have surely seen the affliction of my people which are in Egypt, and have heard their cry by reason of their taskmasters; for I know their sorrows;” Exodus 3:7-10 KJV

And I am come down to deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land unto a good land and a large, unto a land flowing with milk and honey; unto the place of the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Amorites, and the Perizzites, and the Hivites, and the Jebusites. Now, therefore, behold, the cry of the children of Israel is come unto me: and I have also seen the oppression wherewith the Egyptians oppress them. Come now therefore, and I will send thee unto Pharaoh, that thou mayest bring forth my people the children of Israel out of Egypt

After making some excuses, Moses finally obeyed God and confronted Pharaoh.

Moses and Aaron repeatedly appeared before Pharaoh to demand in the mighty name of God:

“Let my people go, that they may serve me in the wilderness”

However, Pharaoh continued to refuse. Moses sternly warned him that God would smite Egypt. Pharaoh remained unyielding. God begins to send a series of horrific plagues upon the Egyptians. In the midst of each plague, Pharaoh promises to let the Children of Israel go, always with some conditions, but he retracts the offer once the affliction has ended.

  • All the waters throughout Egypt turn to blood.
  • Swarms of frogs overrun the land.
  • Lice infest all the men and beasts.
  • Hordes of wild animals invade the cities.
  • An epidemic kills the domestic animals.
  • Painful boils afflict the Egyptians.
  • Fire and ice combine to descend from the skies to form a ravaging hailstorm.
  • A devastating swarm of locusts demolishes all the crops and greenery.
  • A thick, tangible darkness shrouds the land.
  • All the firstborn of Egypt are killed at the stroke of midnight of the 15th of the month of Nissan.

With the final plague, God promised to strike dead every first-born son in Egypt at midnight on the 15th day of the month of Nissan. However, to Moses, the Lord provided instructions so his people would be spared. Each Hebrew family was to take a Passover lamb, slaughter it and place some of the blood on the doorframes of their homes. When the destroyer passed over Egypt, he would not enter the homes covered by the blood of the Passover lamb:

“Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year: ye shall take it out from the sheep, or from the goats: And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening.

In addition, they shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two side-posts and on the upper doorpost of the houses, wherein they shall eat it. In addition, they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; and with bitter herbs, they shall eat it. Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof. And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire. And thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste: it is the LORD’s Passover.”

The first nine plagues only served to dishearten the Pharaoh briefly but were unable to make him completely submit to the will of God. Finally, God ordered the Hebrew slaves to make a sacrifice of a lamb and mark their doors with the blood of the lamb, as an indication to the God to ‘pass over’ their houses while slaying the first-born males of the Egyptians. The Hebrews followed the word of God and thus, their first-born males were saved from the tenth plague. ‘Pesach’ means ‘passing over’ or ‘protection’ in Hebrew. This final calamity was a final blow to the Pharaoh, and he ordered Israelites to be set free immediately and allow their passage put of Egypt.

In their hurry to finally be able to live free lives, Israelites did not even wait to let their dough rise and bake bread but took raw dough instead to bake in the hot desert sun as hard crackers called Matzos on their journey. Moses led them through the desert. The angry Pharaoh changed his mind and led his army to chase after and kill them all. However, through the divine grace of God, the Jews managed to reach the Red Sea, where they seemed trapped by the vast stretch of water. Moses called upon God for help, and all of a sudden, the Red Sea parted to give way to the Israelites, and thus, they safely passed over to the other side on dry land. They were protected forever as the waves closed over the shocked army of the Pharaoh and drowned the whole army at once.

Important World Leaders and Events During This Time

  • Egypt is the undisputed world power during this time.
  • Egyptian bondage and oppression increase, especially towards the Hebrew people.
  • This period saw the beginning of the Hurrian conquests.
  • Hittite King Mursilis I fought the Hurrians on the upper Euphrates River.
  • The Cretan palaces at Knossos and other centers flourish despite disasters.
  • The city of Mycenae, located in the northeast Peloponnesus, comes to dominate the rest of Achaea, giving its name to Mycenaean civilization.
  • Cecrops I builds or rebuilds Athens following the great flood of Deucalion and the end of the Golden age. He becomes the first of several Kings of Athens whose life account is considered part of Greek mythology.
  • Cecrops I, legendary King of Athens, dies after a reign of 50 years. Having survived his own son, he is succeeded by Cranaus.
  • Egypt started to conquer Nubia and the Levant.
  • The element Mercury had been discovered in Egyptian tombs dating from this period.
  • Settlers from Crete, Greece move to Miletus, Turkey.
  • There is evidence of the Mayan civilization developing in Belize.
  • The Phoenicians develop an alphabet.
  • King Cheng Tang of Shang of China, the first ruler of Shang Dynasty, ruled China for 29 years beginning in 1600 B.C.
  • The Edomites lived south of the Dead Sea and blocked the passage of the Israelites to travel through their territory on their way north.
  • The rise of Assyrian power begins to be established.
  • The Kassites rose to political power in Babylon.
  • The Hyksos kingdom was centered in the eastern Nile Delta and Middle Egypt.
  • In Greece, there was a group of people known as “The Pelasgi,” who lived in the region of the Aegean Sea before the coming of the Greeks.
  • The historical, recognizable beginnings of Persia took place in this era.
  • The ancient Chinese art of astronomy is recorded.
  • China is recognized as implementing the first old-age pension plans.
  • Lyrical poetry begins among the ancient Greeks, usually accompanied by a lyre or other stringed instrument.

Main Bible Characters

  • Moses, the son of Jochebed and Amram.
  • Aaron, the older brother of Moses.
  • Pharaoh
References:
Exodus 7:16
Exodus 12
Numbers 9: 1-14; 28:16-25
Deuteronomy 6:20-23, 16:1-6
Leviticus 23:5&6
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What is The Abomination That Causes Desolation?

Today our answer is taken word for word from the entry in Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology which gives a concise and complete answer covering most interpretations.

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An expression that occurs three times in the Septuagint of Daniel (9:27; 11:31; 12:11) and twice in the words of Jesus (Matt 24:15; Mark 13:14), where slight linguistic variation exists. Luke’s account of this prophecy (21:20) is more general and speaks of armies surrounding Jerusalem. First Maccabees, quoting Daniel, refers to these words to the sacrifice of swine’s flesh on the altar in Jerusalem by Antiochus IV, Epiphanes, in 168 b.c. (1:54). Josephus, without referring to Daniel, recounts this episode in detail (Antiq. 7.5.4). Jesus, in using these cryptic words of Daniel, is also predicting a desecration of the temple, or at least the temple area, which will parallel the catastrophic event of the past, so well remembered by the Jews of his day.

Prophecy
“There have been numerous suggestions as to precisely what Jesus meant by this prophecy”

There have been numerous suggestions as to precisely what Jesus meant by this prophecy. It should be noted that for Jesus, the Abomination has become a personal force rather than an event—he stands (in the holy place [Matt 24:15] where he does not belong [Mark 13:14]). This has caused some to look for a particular historical act by an individual for fulfillment (variously, Pilate, Caligula, or Hadrian, more proximately, or more remotely the Antichrist himself in the endtimes) as the ultimate Abomination. Others have argued, especially in light of Luke 21:20 and Daniel’s words, that either the destruction of Jerusalem in a.d. 70 or the desecration of the temple at that time, whether by the apostate Jews beforehand or the Romans afterward, fulfilled Jesus’ prophetic words.

Given the nature of prophetic utterance, which often includes a more proximate and remote fulfillment, there is no reason why there could not be truth in both of these approaches. Jesus could very well be referring to the end of the age—he was, after all, answering the questions of “when will this happen” (i.e., the destruction of the temple) and “what will be the sign of your coming and the end of the age?” (Matt 24:3)—as well as to the destruction of Jerusalem in a.d. 70. If this is so, then the early Christians were right when they fled Jerusalem in obedience to Jesus’ words (Matt 24:16-20), but were also right when they looked for yet another, more cataclysmic fulfillment in the more distant future that would constitute the end of the age.

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David and Bathsheba, How old was their son when he died?

The question: Can you tell me the age of the infant son of David and Bathsheba from their adultery when he died?

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Bethsheba

Answer: No. All we know is that Nathan the prophet was sent to David after the child was born but we do not know how long it was after he was born. We also know that the child was struck ill on that day and lived for seven days. The history is found in 2 Samuel Chapters 11-12. It is interesting that during the entire nine months until the birth of the child and Nathan’s visit David did not write any new psalms. Also, it’s interesting to me that David and Bathsheba’s fifth son, born after the death of their first, is named Nathan.

An excellent discourse on these chapters including repentance, forgiveness, the effects of sin on those around us and more can be found in Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible

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Did Methuselah Really Live 969 of Our Years?

There is so little change in the earth’s spin and revolution that the times and seasons have remained the same for the last 6000 years;  24 hour days, 365 1/4 day years ( they are based on revolutions around the sun and revolutions of the earth.)   That would mean Methuselah really did live 969 of our years.  You might enjoy this information from Tom Whiting on the astronomical earth year.

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year
“as we spiral in closer to the sun (very slowly) we would actually speed up, thus a slightly shorter length of year”

“I know the spin rate (one day) is slowing down due to the gravitational effects of the moon…..about 3 millionths of a second per year (65 million years ago, the dinosaurs had a 20 hour day)….but I’ve never read where our speed around the sun has changed over the millenia.

In fact, I would assume that as we spiral in closer to the sun (very slowly) we would actually speed up, thus a slightly shorter length of year.  But then again, the sun is continuously losing mass through the fusion process to produce energy, so that would allow the Earth (and all the planets) to drift outward slowly, thus lengthening the orbital (yearly) time period. Perhaps the two effects offset each other, because I’ve read nothing about the “year” growing  longer (or shorter) as the centuries and millenia go by.  But if it has, it certainly  is not measurable in our lifetimes, and it would probably affect our calendar by only one day every few million years. “

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How Dates Are Calculated on the Bible Timeline

I have a quick question  – Do you have Jacob’s life dates on it?  I’ve looked on the internet and in Bible history and the only dates I’ve come up with are first half of 2nd millennium BC!   If so how were you able to establish your dates?  How accurate are they?   Thanks, Heather

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Hi Heather:
Our dates are based on Bishop Ussher’s calculations.  These are the dates that were printed in the margins of the Authorized King James Bible since 1701.

If you can get a good date for Adam, you can then come forward using the information in Genesis, which links key male Bible figures from Adam to Solomon giving the age of the father when the son was born.  Using these ages, we get that Jacob was born 2168 years after the creation of Adam.

Bible_Timeline_Dates

Using 4004 BC as the date of Adam’s creation we easily calculate that Jacob was born in 1836 BC (4004BC -2168 years)  He lived 147 years which means he died in 1689BC.  See Genesis 25:36 and 47:28.

Our dates are based on Ussher’s calculations which are considered accurate by most Biblical and many secular historians.

Here’s our page on historical proofs of the Bible.

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Herod’s Tomb True Or False?

Herod's Tomb

Once again archaeologists and Biblical scholars are questioning a find that was originally accepted as correct.

In 2007 a well known and respected Herodium archaeologist, Efram Netzer, declared Herods tomb had been found based on the writings of the historian Josephus and additional evidence.

However other scholars question that find based on the simplicity of the tomb – suggesting that Herod, a man known for his huge ego and great building projects, would have had a much finer tomb.
You can read more about that here. http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-sites-places/biblical-archaeology-sites/herodium-the-tomb-of-king-herod-revisited/

A good description with photos of Herodium, and the possible tomb are in this online issue of the Smithsonian
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/finding-king-herods-tomb-34296862/?no-ist

Both articles are filled with the methods archaeologist/historians use to determine and validate their finds. For example according to the Smithsonian article of August 2009 ” The high quality of the craftsmanship suggested the sarcophagus was fit for a king. Plus, the extent of the fragmentation suggested that people had deliberately smashed it—a plausible outcome for the hated monarch’s resting place. Based on coins and other items found nearby, Netzer surmises that the desecration occurred during the first Jewish revolt against the Romans, from A.D. 66 to 73. (As Kasher notes in his biography, “Herod the Great” was, for the Jews, an ironic title, designating an arrogant monarch who scorned the religious laws of his own people.)”

So has Herod’s tomb been found? The search continues either to confirm this is the tomb or to find another.

References:
Photo of Herod’s Tomb from wikicommons from photographer Deror avi
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50 Biblical People Confirmed by Archaeologists

archaeological evidence of the Bible

Archaeological evidence shows that at least 50 people in the Bible are confirmed by inscriptions found by archaeologists. Many of these people are found on the Bible Timeline

You can read more about who the 50 people are and what archaeological evidence exists here
http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/people-cultures-in-the-bible/people-in-the-bible/50-people-in-the-bible-confirmed-archaeologically/

More information is found on our post about Historical Proof of the Bible

Photo of engraved hieroglypics in public domain from French Wiki article, needed for translation of article.

Source: fr:Image:Egypt Hieroglyphe4.jpg Afbeelding van hiërogliefen, afkomstig van gebruiker w:fr:Utilisateur:Aoineko en geplaatst onder de GNU Vrije Documentatie Licentie door deze.