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The Shroud of Turin: Digging for Truth Episode 165

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Digging For Truth Episode 75: Ape-Men and Adam (Part Two)

Are you ready for the second episode of Ape-Men and Adam from the Digging For Truth Youtube channel? Find out more about primitive people from a biblical perspective by clicking the link below!
 
Source: Digging For Truth Episode 75: Ape-Men and Adam (Part Two)
Produced by: Associates for Biblical Research
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Digging For Truth Episode 74: Ape-Men and Adam (Part 1)

Have you ever wondered about how Ape-Men, Neanderthals and the Missing Link fit into the narrative of scripture? Is the biblical account really at odds with fossil evidence? Learn more about this topic by checking out the Digging For Truth episode linked below. Go ahead and share your thoughts by leaving a blog comment as well!
 
Source: Digging For Truth Episode 74: Ape-Men and Adam (Part 1)
Produced by: Associates for Biblical Research
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Digging for Truth: The Old Testament Text: Preservation or Chaos? (Part 1)

Have you ever had questions about the origin and reliability of the Old Testament manuscripts? Where does our Old Testament come from and can we trust it? Find the answers to these questions and more by clicking the link below!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkOOkHxfJ4k

Source:
Digging for Truth: The Old Testament Text: Preservation or Chaos? (Part 1)
Produced by: The Associates for Biblical Research

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The Dead Sea Scrolls with Dr. Craig Evans: Digging for Truth Episode 66 (Part One)

Have you ever been curious about the Dead Sea Scrolls? Where were they found and what do they contain? To learn more about this fascinating archaeological discovery, watch the video linked below. Make sure to share your thoughts by leaving a blog comment!

Source: The Dead Sea Scrolls with Dr. Craig Evans:
Digging for Truth Episode 66 (Part One)
Produced by: The Associates for Biblical Truth

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Apostle Andrew

Andrew was one of Jesus’ first disciples. Unlike his brother Simon Peter, the readers of the Bible know so little of him. He became an apostle in Matthew 10 and remained as one of the Twelve even after the Lord’s death. It was said that he wrote the apocryphal text of the Acts of Andrew, and preached in the cities of Kiev and Novgorod. He was later crucified on an X-shaped cross or ‘saltire’ in the Greek city of Patras.

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Andrew and his older brother Simon Peter were born in Bethsaida (John 1:44). Both men worked as fishermen, and Jesus called them as his disciples just as they had cast their net into the sea (Matthew 4:18; Mark 1:16). John 1:40 offered a different version of Andrew’s calling as a disciple when he wrote that Andrew first found and followed Jesus. John also wrote that it was Andrew himself who led his brother Simon to Jesus.

andrew_apostle
“Andrew the Apostle”

Andrew’s name appeared on the list of disciples on all Synoptic Gospels (Matt. 10:2; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:14). He was also present during one of Jesus’ most important sermons on the Mount of Olives about the signs of the end of age (Mark 13:3). It was Andrew who brought the boy with five loaves of bread and two fish to Jesus during the feeding of the five thousand (John 6:8). All twelve disciples were present during the Last Supper, but unlike the others, Andrew would only be mentioned once again in the Book of Acts (1:13).

Andrew’s Life After Jesus

Church historians filled in the gaps of Andrew’s life after the death of Jesus. Eusebius of Caesarea wrote that he went to preach in Scythia and that he later wrote the book of Acts of Andrew. He travelled further north and preached in the cities of Kiev and Novgorod. He also preached in Thrace, and later travelled south to Achaea in Greece where he was crucified on an X-shaped cross. His relics remained at the Saint Andrew of Patras Cathedral in Achaea. He is honored as the patron saint of Scotland, Russia, Ukraine, Cyprus, and Romania.

His feast day is held on the 30th of November. This day is also celebrated by Scotland as its National Day, and by Romania as the official Saint Andrew’s Day.

References:
Picture By Artus WolffortWeb Gallery of Art:   Image  Info about artwork, Public Domain, Link
Coogan, Michael David., ed. The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Douglas, J. D., and Earle E. Cairns, eds. The New International Dictionary of the Christian Church. Grand Rapids: Zondervan Pub., 1978.
Eusebius of Caesarea. Eusebius of Caesarea. Accessed November 16, 2016. http://www.documentacatholicaomnia.eu/03d/0265-0339,_Eusebius_Caesariensis,_Church_History,_EN.pdf.
MacRory, Joseph. “St. Andrew.” The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 16 Nov. 2016 <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01471a.htm>.
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Thanksgiving Offering (Mosaic Law)

In a world that is full of tragedy and uncertainties, what is there to be thankful for?

For the Pilgrims who sailed from England to the New World aboard the ship Mayflower, there was a lot to be grateful for when they first landed in New England nearly four-hundred years ago. They were thankful for their safe landing on the shores of America after a dangerous voyage across the Atlantic. It was then followed by their survival from the harsh winter in their new homeland with the help of a Native American named Squanto and an allied tribe. When November 1621 arrived, those who survived celebrated the “First Thanksgiving” for God’s providence and benevolence with new friends.

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But the act of thanksgiving (or its offering and celebration) can also be traced back to the ancient Israelites right after their exodus from Egypt when they first started to craft laws and introduced punishments and rewards for their people. These were not ordinary laws as they were given by God through Moses. These laws also included something unique to the Hebrew culture called the todah or the thanksgiving offering. The todah (or specifically korban todah) means thanksgiving offering, but it can also be an act of confession, sacrifice, and even praise to God in some Biblical passages. Verses related to the act of todah or thanksgiving offering can be found from the book of Leviticus to the book of Jonah, but it was first mentioned in Leviticus 7:12-15.

thanksgiving
“The Embarkation of the Pilgrims (1857) by American painter Robert Walter Weir “

12 If he offers it for a thanksgiving, then he shall offer with the thanksgiving sacrifice unleavened loaves mixed with oil, unleavened wafers smeared with oil, and loaves of fine flour well mixed with oil. 13 With the sacrifice of his peace offerings for thanksgiving he shall bring his offering with loaves of leavened bread. 14 And from it he shall offer one loaf from each offering, as a gift to the Lord. It shall belong to the priest who throws the blood of the peace offerings. 15 And the flesh of the sacrifice of his peace offerings for thanksgiving shall be eaten on the day of his offering. He shall not leave any of it until the morning. -Leviticus 7:12-15

For the Hebrew sages, Psalm 107 offered a glimpse of some events that deserved the thanksgiving offering which included:

* The safe arrival of a person who went on a dangerous journey across a desert.
* The safe arrival of a person’s journey across the sea.
* The freedom of those who were captured or imprisoned.
* The deliverance of those who rebelled but were later remorseful.

These were some of the many examples in the Bible. Throughout the book of Psalms, the psalmists found many instances worthy of thanksgiving offering that went beyond the occasional ones laid out in Leviticus 7. Today’s world offers an uncertain future, but the practice of todah or thanksgiving offering anchors us in God’s love and reminds us that gratitude can be practiced every day.

References:
Picture By Robert Walter WeirPwHe6-AEvwmbIw at Google Cultural Institute maximum zoom level, Public Domain, Link
“8426. (todah) — Thanksgiving.” Bible Hub. Accessed November 09, 2016. http://biblehub.com/hebrew/8426.htm.
“History of Thanksgiving.” History.com. 2009. Accessed November 09, 2016. http://www.history.com/topics/thanksgiving/history-of-thanksgiving.
Travis, Rabbi Daniel. “Tefilah: Praying With Joy.” Torah.org. Accessed November 09, 2016. http://torah.org/learning/tefilah-korbantodah/.